• Olympus M.Zuiko 9mm F8.0 Fisheye Body Cap Lens BCL-0980 for Micro Four Thirds Cameras
  • Olympus M.Zuiko 9mm F8.0 Fisheye Body Cap Lens BCL-0980 for Micro Four Thirds Cameras
  • Olympus M.Zuiko 9mm F8.0 Fisheye Body Cap Lens BCL-0980 for Micro Four Thirds Cameras
Olympus M.Zuiko 9mm F8.0 Fisheye Body Cap Lens BCL-0980 for Micro Four Thirds Cameras
Olympus M.Zuiko 9mm F8.0 Fisheye Body Cap Lens BCL-0980 for Micro Four Thirds Cameras
Olympus M.Zuiko 9mm F8.0 Fisheye Body Cap Lens BCL-0980 for Micro Four Thirds Cameras

Olympus M.Zuiko 9mm F8.0 Fisheye Body Cap Lens BCL-0980 for Micro Four Thirds Cameras

SKU:HAI19TVU2
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Dhs. 648.00
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Dhs. 1,080.00
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days

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  • Body cap with built-in fisheye lens
  • Ultra-wide 18mm equivalent field of view
  • Great discreet street shooting lens
  • All-glass lens elements
  • Manual focus only with close-up and infinity focus settings

Customer Reviews

a simple way to turn it into a micro lensThe overall performance is beyond my expectation.And one trick to mention, thanks to another flickr user, is that if you don't screw the lens onto the mount, but just fix it directly on the body, you will get it work as a macro. The reason is the distance between the lens and the sensor is longer. I've tried it and got some interesting images. See in the costumer gallery.5HipshootingI chose this as a quick shooting pancake lens. It is fast and it is flat. Lens opens giving you a near, mid, and far lens opening. Works fine. The other "normal" commercial lens billed as "pancake" are only pancake until you turn them on. I use a Olympus EPL1. Love the cam. I was using an Industar 69 28mm lens with an M39 mount, but that was essentially a normal lens on this camera. The 9mm body cap lens is much more fun and versatile. I found that the viewfinder from a lomo Diana 20mm lens kit has almost an identical field of view, for quick viewfinding. No need to compose of the video screen. Especially helpful in sunlight or with moving targets... Great lens, perfectly adequate for the purpose.5What a fun tiny lensImage quality of this little thing surpassed my expectations !Sure, if you need faster 90-100% sharpness form edge to edge the more expensive, bulkier and heavier Rokinon 7.5 fish-eye, or a pro-lens like the Olympus 8mm fish-eye, will leave it behind.But for portability convenience this 9mm cap is by far the best.So incredibly small and light that will fit anywhere, including compact cases side or internal pockets intended for filters.It performs very well in good light conditions but not indicated for low light conditions unless used with support or tripod.I even gave it a try for night photography but being a slow constant f8 lens exposure times have to be longer or use high ISOs with their noise side effects, like the 90sec exposure in the attached photo5FUN!This is a fun, cheap, albeit great little lens! Yes, the indentation between close and the various focus spots is very weak, but it takes nice imagery. In a word, FUN. I use it on my PEN-F. Bought it as a lens cap. I have been using it a LOT as of late. It is very handy. Outside, it is outstanding. Inside, takes a higher ISO or a tripod/support (due to the slow f/8 focal length). Maybe not a true competitor to the M. Zuiko 8mm, but still a lot of fun for walking or grab shots.4Good lens, only a few complaintsThis lens is pretty good, its nice and sharp all the way through my pics, only thing i dont like is that its an f.8, i like quality so i hate cranking up the iso, to get good shutter speeds you gotta shoot in sunlight, even on a cloudy day the shutter speeds are much lower than id like with allot of my shots coming out not as perfectly clear as id like, but i cant minus a star for that, i bought it knowing it was a f.8, the focus lever is annoying i gotta say, i wish it was a ring around the lens, im always taking shot and notice the focus wasent perfectly in the place it should be, it has 3 focal points.5Good value, an affordable, useful lens, with some glaring limitationsLens works, great value for a fish eye lens in MFT format.Pros:CheapSmallDoubles as a camera body capCan be focused (has convenient zone focus stops)Cons:Very poor lens flare control and lens contrast control, major issues in high-contrast photos.Poor edge sharpnessNoticeable chromatic aberration at the edgesIn high-contrast situations, this lens shows it's limitations. When you have adequate exposure for the shadows, the highlights will block, and not necessarily with extremely bright sunlight, just normal daylight seems to be able to cause significant internal lens flare, with substantial image impact, even in fairly even lighting conditions, even when the sun is behind you. That being said, this is a very affordable lens with good sharpness in the middle, and, overall, pretty good results, if you keep the lighting even.I'm attaching some photos taken with this lens. In the first two photos you can see the sharpness of the lens, and, it's effect. In the third photo you can see the lens having issues with the highlights blocking.3Cheap and Fun. Image quality is fine considering what this is.What is not to love? Cheap, tiny, travels well, and takes decent shots considering the price.Yes stuck at f/8 so you need good light and the image quality is OK, but for a cheap, fun, small, budget lens that seconds as a body cap, this is great. I have a nicer f/3.5 fisheye that takes much better shots, but it is large, protruding lens element and all metal construction so rather heavy. But when I am on vacation with the family this is the one I take for travel. It is so light and small it fits in your front pocket and if you didn't know any better, when blindly reaching for it in your bag you may think you are grabbing a lens cap rather than the lens.Throw it on the camera for quick fun shots anytime and in bright daylight it takes great shots considering the price. When you are done you literally can take it off and slide it into your jeans pocket.The focusing lever takes a little getting used to and basically has a couple detent presets for close up, medium distance, and infinity. They work for most shots but if you really want to you can move the lever into in-between positions to fine tune your focus. But for most fisheye photos, close is good enough. I found the middle position (medium distance) is probably the most used.I would recommend this especially if you have never played around with a fisheye lens and are not sure if you will like it. For the less than $90 I paid for this, is is a cheap test-drive of fisheye photography. And for those of us already with a "real" fisheye lens, this one is still very handy to have as well.5Simple, cheap and a lot of fun.A very simple and inexpensive lens, but a lot of fun. No it isn't crystal sharp corner to corner but it does pretty good none the less. A 120 degree diagonal angle of view. Called a body cap lens because it is barely larger then the camera body body cap. The aperture is fixed to F8 and is not variable. the focus control settings are "Shutter closed, close focus (very close) and distance focus" so only 3 simple settings. It is however a tremendous amount of fun to shoot with. And for a less then $100 lens the sharpness and detail is very good. Absolutely no regrets getting this.5Like so many peopleLike so many people, I don't have an endless supply of money to spend on lens. That's the downside to hobby photography... I'm sure most people would like a shelf filled with Leica and Zeiss glass, but that's awful hard to justify if you're not independently wealthy or a pro photographer.In that regard, a good portion of hobby photography is finding the odd little 'gem' that allows you to try something new and creative without cashing in your 401k. That's exactly what this lens is. As so many people have pointed out, the picture is surprisingly sharp (for a lens of this type) and in daylight you really do get some beautiful shots. With the fixed f8, this isn't really an indoor or a dawn/dusk lens, but when you're looking for a very wide angle you're probably not in an enclosed space. With careful composition you can minimize the distortion inherent to this focal length, or exaggerate it if you want everything to be a Beastie Boys video.The one pro to this lens I haven't really heard many people mention is how it frees you up in your lens decision. If I'm going out without a camera bag, as much as I'd like to take my fast 50mm prime... I usually wind up taking the 14-42 f3.5 kit lens so I can have those wider angles and get closer up when I need it. The kit zoom is my 'lens of convenience'. Now, I can literally throw the BCL-0980 in my pocket (not a figure of speech, it's actually in my pocket right now) and be prepared with a similar range but with a much, much faster aperture at the high end.Of course the downside to this approach is the lever based 'cap' often finds itself opening up in my pocket, but I think I'll solve that with a tiny strip of gaffers tape to pin it closed in pocket scenarios.The easy alternative is also to just pop the BCL-0980 onto the camera and head out into the world. With a smaller mirrorless, this lens will transform your camera into a compact point and shoot form factor.All told, absolutely money well spent!5How did they pack so much fun into such a tiny lens??? (Bonus comparison to Sigma 8-16mm!)This cheap lens has quickly become one of my favorite m43 lenses. It's tiny, it's sharp, and the perspective matches the human field of view better than any wide-angle lens I've ever used.So if you take a picture in a room with this lens, it represents how the room actually looked and felt in terms of space and distance, preserving the proportionality. Most ultra-wide lenses stretch things unnaturally at the edges, and most other fisheye lenses have a much more pronounced fisheye effect, bulging the center out. This lens seems to find the perfect balance.In summary, this lens is a blast to use, and it's one of the best values I've ever found in lenses.----------------The following is a detailed comparison I did on Pentaxforums between this "toy" lens and one of the best Ultra Wide Angle zoom lenses out there...the Sigma 8-16mm. Unfortunately, Amazon reviews do not post the full-sized images, as referenced in the review. My original review, which includes full-size pics, is titled "Just for fun: SIgma 8-16mm (K-mount) vs Olympus 9mm f8 fisheye body cap lens review"I've decided to go to a dual Pentax DSLR / m43 system, but since I'm not made of money, I've had to make some difficult decisions regarding my DSLR lenses. I sadly sold my Sigma 8-16mm a few days ago, and I'm trying to decide between the Olympus 9-18mm or the Panasonic 7-14mm lens to replace it.In the meantime, I found out about the Olympus 9mm fisheye "body cap lens", and figured that for the price it was worth a try to hold me over until I re-acquire a proper UWA lens. So how does an $88 body cap compare to the widest rectilinear lens available for APS-C cameras? For the price, better than I thought!I've attached a couple pictures of the lens...er, body cap, mounted on my Panasonic GX7The first two sample pictures are photos I took within minutes of unboxing the lens, as I was walking to meet my kids at the bus stop. The school bus picture had the top and bottom cropped, but it has not been resized; and the car picture is not cropped or resized. So if you click on the pictures, you can download the 100% picture to pixel peep it. [Full size pictures not available on Amazon reviews]When I got home and loaded the picture onto my computer, the thing that amazed me is how sharp they were throughout most of the center part of the frame.So the lens is usable, but how does it compare to the mighty Sigma 8-16mm? Well, in overall image quality, the Sigma definitely wins. The Sigma is sharp edge-to-edge, and has better contrast than the little fisheye. When shooting in RAW, you will probably want to add some zing to the fisheye pictures.So if you're wanting to shoot an ultra-wide angle just for fun, and/or you won't be printing large images, then the Olympus lens can provide a lot of utility. But if you're doing critical work, then you'll definitely want to use a real lens.The other thing I was curious about is the comparative angle of view of the two lenses. I was under the impression that the fisheye would be a little wider, since the 8-16mm is supposed to have a 121 degree angle of view on APS-C, while the fisheye supposedly has 140 degree angle of view. But in practice, it seemed like the lenses were very evenly matched. In fact, it seemed like the 8-16mm captured a bit more at the left and right edges, but I don't know if that's really a fair comparison, since the APS-C sensor is wider side-to-side than the 4/3 sensor.The big difference is the way the two lenses capture the wide angle. The Olympus fisheye shows a lot of barrel distortion in the middle, and curves the edges of the frame, while the Sigma gives you straight edges, but gives you kind of a pinched view, with objects at the edge stretched and objects in the center of the frame shrunk.I've never used a fisheye lens before, but my understanding is that the Olympus is not quite a true fisheye, since it does not provide a 180 angle of view. As far as I'm concerned, this mild-fisheye makes the lens easier to use in more situations since it is not too exaggerated. Depending on the scene, it may not even be obvious that the lens is a fisheye.Here's a couple comparison pictures, and again, you can click for a full-size image. [You will need use the link above to view the Sigma/Olympus comparison pictures.]I'm not sure that I prefer one approach to the other. The fisheye is cool with some scenes, but in other cases it just looks strange. And kind of the same thing with the 8-16mm.One thing I do appreciate from the fisheye is that the proportions of a scene are better preserved. These next two images demonstrate that characteristic.In the bedroom picture, the fisheye picture does a pretty good job of representing the actual size of the room. But in the Sigma version, the room looks larger than it is, since the bed is shrunk and the floorspace in front of the bed is stretch. And in the Sigma picture, the little mirror in the corner looks huge.I think that either picture looks okay, but if these pictures were used for real estate purposes, the Sigma picture could be considered a bit misleading since it seems to add square footage to the room. (BTW, that is something I have noticed with some real estate pictures, and it always annoys me.)For the second picture in my home theater area, both lenses were kind of a fail. Again, the Olympus picture does a good job of showing the relative size of the speakers to the screen, etc, but it just looks bizarre seeing the screen and speakers curved like that.And the Sigma does a good job of keep the lines straight, but the screen looks tiny and the center speaker look tiny, and the L/R speakers look huge. And since they are canted a bit to aim towards the center of the seating area, the rectilinear lens makes them look oblong.And for the sake of comparison, I've included a more normal shot showing pretty much how the home theater area appears in person. This picture was taken with my Olympus XZ-1 at 30mm equivalent:So for everybody who has been dying for a comparison of those two lenses, there you go!I'll finish up with a few pics comparing the physical dimensions of the Pentax K-30 & Sigma 8-16mm combo to the Panasonic GX7 & Olympus 9mm fisheye combo. (These pictures were courtesy of my old Olympus XZ-1 since that's the only other camera I have with a hotshoe!)It still blows me away how little this thing is! There's been many times when I wanted to take my 8-16mm along, but I just couldn't bring myself bring add a 3rd heavy lens to my normal two-lens kit. Now I'll just be able to slip this little guy into a pocket or something, and forget I even have it with me until I want to use it.5
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Description
  • Body cap with built-in fisheye lens
  • Ultra-wide 18mm equivalent field of view
  • Great discreet street shooting lens
  • All-glass lens elements
  • Manual focus only with close-up and infinity focus settings
Reviews

Customer Reviews

a simple way to turn it into a micro lensThe overall performance is beyond my expectation.And one trick to mention, thanks to another flickr user, is that if you don't screw the lens onto the mount, but just fix it directly on the body, you will get it work as a macro. The reason is the distance between the lens and the sensor is longer. I've tried it and got some interesting images. See in the costumer gallery.5HipshootingI chose this as a quick shooting pancake lens. It is fast and it is flat. Lens opens giving you a near, mid, and far lens opening. Works fine. The other "normal" commercial lens billed as "pancake" are only pancake until you turn them on. I use a Olympus EPL1. Love the cam. I was using an Industar 69 28mm lens with an M39 mount, but that was essentially a normal lens on this camera. The 9mm body cap lens is much more fun and versatile. I found that the viewfinder from a lomo Diana 20mm lens kit has almost an identical field of view, for quick viewfinding. No need to compose of the video screen. Especially helpful in sunlight or with moving targets... Great lens, perfectly adequate for the purpose.5What a fun tiny lensImage quality of this little thing surpassed my expectations !Sure, if you need faster 90-100% sharpness form edge to edge the more expensive, bulkier and heavier Rokinon 7.5 fish-eye, or a pro-lens like the Olympus 8mm fish-eye, will leave it behind.But for portability convenience this 9mm cap is by far the best.So incredibly small and light that will fit anywhere, including compact cases side or internal pockets intended for filters.It performs very well in good light conditions but not indicated for low light conditions unless used with support or tripod.I even gave it a try for night photography but being a slow constant f8 lens exposure times have to be longer or use high ISOs with their noise side effects, like the 90sec exposure in the attached photo5FUN!This is a fun, cheap, albeit great little lens! Yes, the indentation between close and the various focus spots is very weak, but it takes nice imagery. In a word, FUN. I use it on my PEN-F. Bought it as a lens cap. I have been using it a LOT as of late. It is very handy. Outside, it is outstanding. Inside, takes a higher ISO or a tripod/support (due to the slow f/8 focal length). Maybe not a true competitor to the M. Zuiko 8mm, but still a lot of fun for walking or grab shots.4Good lens, only a few complaintsThis lens is pretty good, its nice and sharp all the way through my pics, only thing i dont like is that its an f.8, i like quality so i hate cranking up the iso, to get good shutter speeds you gotta shoot in sunlight, even on a cloudy day the shutter speeds are much lower than id like with allot of my shots coming out not as perfectly clear as id like, but i cant minus a star for that, i bought it knowing it was a f.8, the focus lever is annoying i gotta say, i wish it was a ring around the lens, im always taking shot and notice the focus wasent perfectly in the place it should be, it has 3 focal points.5Good value, an affordable, useful lens, with some glaring limitationsLens works, great value for a fish eye lens in MFT format.Pros:CheapSmallDoubles as a camera body capCan be focused (has convenient zone focus stops)Cons:Very poor lens flare control and lens contrast control, major issues in high-contrast photos.Poor edge sharpnessNoticeable chromatic aberration at the edgesIn high-contrast situations, this lens shows it's limitations. When you have adequate exposure for the shadows, the highlights will block, and not necessarily with extremely bright sunlight, just normal daylight seems to be able to cause significant internal lens flare, with substantial image impact, even in fairly even lighting conditions, even when the sun is behind you. That being said, this is a very affordable lens with good sharpness in the middle, and, overall, pretty good results, if you keep the lighting even.I'm attaching some photos taken with this lens. In the first two photos you can see the sharpness of the lens, and, it's effect. In the third photo you can see the lens having issues with the highlights blocking.3Cheap and Fun. Image quality is fine considering what this is.What is not to love? Cheap, tiny, travels well, and takes decent shots considering the price.Yes stuck at f/8 so you need good light and the image quality is OK, but for a cheap, fun, small, budget lens that seconds as a body cap, this is great. I have a nicer f/3.5 fisheye that takes much better shots, but it is large, protruding lens element and all metal construction so rather heavy. But when I am on vacation with the family this is the one I take for travel. It is so light and small it fits in your front pocket and if you didn't know any better, when blindly reaching for it in your bag you may think you are grabbing a lens cap rather than the lens.Throw it on the camera for quick fun shots anytime and in bright daylight it takes great shots considering the price. When you are done you literally can take it off and slide it into your jeans pocket.The focusing lever takes a little getting used to and basically has a couple detent presets for close up, medium distance, and infinity. They work for most shots but if you really want to you can move the lever into in-between positions to fine tune your focus. But for most fisheye photos, close is good enough. I found the middle position (medium distance) is probably the most used.I would recommend this especially if you have never played around with a fisheye lens and are not sure if you will like it. For the less than $90 I paid for this, is is a cheap test-drive of fisheye photography. And for those of us already with a "real" fisheye lens, this one is still very handy to have as well.5Simple, cheap and a lot of fun.A very simple and inexpensive lens, but a lot of fun. No it isn't crystal sharp corner to corner but it does pretty good none the less. A 120 degree diagonal angle of view. Called a body cap lens because it is barely larger then the camera body body cap. The aperture is fixed to F8 and is not variable. the focus control settings are "Shutter closed, close focus (very close) and distance focus" so only 3 simple settings. It is however a tremendous amount of fun to shoot with. And for a less then $100 lens the sharpness and detail is very good. Absolutely no regrets getting this.5Like so many peopleLike so many people, I don't have an endless supply of money to spend on lens. That's the downside to hobby photography... I'm sure most people would like a shelf filled with Leica and Zeiss glass, but that's awful hard to justify if you're not independently wealthy or a pro photographer.In that regard, a good portion of hobby photography is finding the odd little 'gem' that allows you to try something new and creative without cashing in your 401k. That's exactly what this lens is. As so many people have pointed out, the picture is surprisingly sharp (for a lens of this type) and in daylight you really do get some beautiful shots. With the fixed f8, this isn't really an indoor or a dawn/dusk lens, but when you're looking for a very wide angle you're probably not in an enclosed space. With careful composition you can minimize the distortion inherent to this focal length, or exaggerate it if you want everything to be a Beastie Boys video.The one pro to this lens I haven't really heard many people mention is how it frees you up in your lens decision. If I'm going out without a camera bag, as much as I'd like to take my fast 50mm prime... I usually wind up taking the 14-42 f3.5 kit lens so I can have those wider angles and get closer up when I need it. The kit zoom is my 'lens of convenience'. Now, I can literally throw the BCL-0980 in my pocket (not a figure of speech, it's actually in my pocket right now) and be prepared with a similar range but with a much, much faster aperture at the high end.Of course the downside to this approach is the lever based 'cap' often finds itself opening up in my pocket, but I think I'll solve that with a tiny strip of gaffers tape to pin it closed in pocket scenarios.The easy alternative is also to just pop the BCL-0980 onto the camera and head out into the world. With a smaller mirrorless, this lens will transform your camera into a compact point and shoot form factor.All told, absolutely money well spent!5How did they pack so much fun into such a tiny lens??? (Bonus comparison to Sigma 8-16mm!)This cheap lens has quickly become one of my favorite m43 lenses. It's tiny, it's sharp, and the perspective matches the human field of view better than any wide-angle lens I've ever used.So if you take a picture in a room with this lens, it represents how the room actually looked and felt in terms of space and distance, preserving the proportionality. Most ultra-wide lenses stretch things unnaturally at the edges, and most other fisheye lenses have a much more pronounced fisheye effect, bulging the center out. This lens seems to find the perfect balance.In summary, this lens is a blast to use, and it's one of the best values I've ever found in lenses.----------------The following is a detailed comparison I did on Pentaxforums between this "toy" lens and one of the best Ultra Wide Angle zoom lenses out there...the Sigma 8-16mm. Unfortunately, Amazon reviews do not post the full-sized images, as referenced in the review. My original review, which includes full-size pics, is titled "Just for fun: SIgma 8-16mm (K-mount) vs Olympus 9mm f8 fisheye body cap lens review"I've decided to go to a dual Pentax DSLR / m43 system, but since I'm not made of money, I've had to make some difficult decisions regarding my DSLR lenses. I sadly sold my Sigma 8-16mm a few days ago, and I'm trying to decide between the Olympus 9-18mm or the Panasonic 7-14mm lens to replace it.In the meantime, I found out about the Olympus 9mm fisheye "body cap lens", and figured that for the price it was worth a try to hold me over until I re-acquire a proper UWA lens. So how does an $88 body cap compare to the widest rectilinear lens available for APS-C cameras? For the price, better than I thought!I've attached a couple pictures of the lens...er, body cap, mounted on my Panasonic GX7The first two sample pictures are photos I took within minutes of unboxing the lens, as I was walking to meet my kids at the bus stop. The school bus picture had the top and bottom cropped, but it has not been resized; and the car picture is not cropped or resized. So if you click on the pictures, you can download the 100% picture to pixel peep it. [Full size pictures not available on Amazon reviews]When I got home and loaded the picture onto my computer, the thing that amazed me is how sharp they were throughout most of the center part of the frame.So the lens is usable, but how does it compare to the mighty Sigma 8-16mm? Well, in overall image quality, the Sigma definitely wins. The Sigma is sharp edge-to-edge, and has better contrast than the little fisheye. When shooting in RAW, you will probably want to add some zing to the fisheye pictures.So if you're wanting to shoot an ultra-wide angle just for fun, and/or you won't be printing large images, then the Olympus lens can provide a lot of utility. But if you're doing critical work, then you'll definitely want to use a real lens.The other thing I was curious about is the comparative angle of view of the two lenses. I was under the impression that the fisheye would be a little wider, since the 8-16mm is supposed to have a 121 degree angle of view on APS-C, while the fisheye supposedly has 140 degree angle of view. But in practice, it seemed like the lenses were very evenly matched. In fact, it seemed like the 8-16mm captured a bit more at the left and right edges, but I don't know if that's really a fair comparison, since the APS-C sensor is wider side-to-side than the 4/3 sensor.The big difference is the way the two lenses capture the wide angle. The Olympus fisheye shows a lot of barrel distortion in the middle, and curves the edges of the frame, while the Sigma gives you straight edges, but gives you kind of a pinched view, with objects at the edge stretched and objects in the center of the frame shrunk.I've never used a fisheye lens before, but my understanding is that the Olympus is not quite a true fisheye, since it does not provide a 180 angle of view. As far as I'm concerned, this mild-fisheye makes the lens easier to use in more situations since it is not too exaggerated. Depending on the scene, it may not even be obvious that the lens is a fisheye.Here's a couple comparison pictures, and again, you can click for a full-size image. [You will need use the link above to view the Sigma/Olympus comparison pictures.]I'm not sure that I prefer one approach to the other. The fisheye is cool with some scenes, but in other cases it just looks strange. And kind of the same thing with the 8-16mm.One thing I do appreciate from the fisheye is that the proportions of a scene are better preserved. These next two images demonstrate that characteristic.In the bedroom picture, the fisheye picture does a pretty good job of representing the actual size of the room. But in the Sigma version, the room looks larger than it is, since the bed is shrunk and the floorspace in front of the bed is stretch. And in the Sigma picture, the little mirror in the corner looks huge.I think that either picture looks okay, but if these pictures were used for real estate purposes, the Sigma picture could be considered a bit misleading since it seems to add square footage to the room. (BTW, that is something I have noticed with some real estate pictures, and it always annoys me.)For the second picture in my home theater area, both lenses were kind of a fail. Again, the Olympus picture does a good job of showing the relative size of the speakers to the screen, etc, but it just looks bizarre seeing the screen and speakers curved like that.And the Sigma does a good job of keep the lines straight, but the screen looks tiny and the center speaker look tiny, and the L/R speakers look huge. And since they are canted a bit to aim towards the center of the seating area, the rectilinear lens makes them look oblong.And for the sake of comparison, I've included a more normal shot showing pretty much how the home theater area appears in person. This picture was taken with my Olympus XZ-1 at 30mm equivalent:So for everybody who has been dying for a comparison of those two lenses, there you go!I'll finish up with a few pics comparing the physical dimensions of the Pentax K-30 & Sigma 8-16mm combo to the Panasonic GX7 & Olympus 9mm fisheye combo. (These pictures were courtesy of my old Olympus XZ-1 since that's the only other camera I have with a hotshoe!)It still blows me away how little this thing is! There's been many times when I wanted to take my 8-16mm along, but I just couldn't bring myself bring add a 3rd heavy lens to my normal two-lens kit. Now I'll just be able to slip this little guy into a pocket or something, and forget I even have it with me until I want to use it.5
See All Reviews
Return And Refund Policy
  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 10 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@directnine.uk, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
  • To be eligible for return, products must be in the exact condition you received them in. All packaging material must be undamaged and unused with the price tags intact.
  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
  • Due to the nature of the products that we sell, we will not be able to replace or refund unwanted items if they have been opened or any seals are broken.
  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
  • If your refund is approved, then it will automatically be credited to the original method of payment, within 7-10 days.
  • DirectNine reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.
Delivery Policy
Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched. The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing. In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.

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